New date for AusRAIL PLUS

AusRAIL PLUS, the largest rail rail industry event in Australia and New Zealand, will now take place from Monday, 28 February – Wednesday, 2 March, 2022, at the International Convention Centre in Sydney. 

Hosted by the Australasian Railway Association, the annual conference brings together all facets of the rail industry under the one roof over three days, incorporating an expansive conference program combined with an extensive trade exhibition. 

Current Queensland border restrictions, and the ongoing uncertainty about when they will be lifted, has resulted in the need to seek new arrangements for the event, originally scheduled for December this year. 

With NSW’s roadmap out of lockdown confirming the state will be open for business in the new year, organisers are optimistic about a successful AusRAIL PLUS at the new venue, giving attendees the chance to network, share information and take advantage of an outstanding program. 

 

Updated program for AusRAIL PLUS

The latest program for Australasia’s largest rail industry conference, AusRAIL PLUS, is now available, featuring new international keynotes, presentations from senior industry leaders and unparalleled networking opportunities. Read more

Peak fares cut by 50 per cent in NSW

To encourage commuters to travel outside of peak periods, Transport for NSW is lowering fares across the Sydney network.

Outside of the peaks, which run from 6.30am to 10am, and 3pm to 7pm in Sydney and 6am to 10am on Intercity Trains, fares will be discounted by 50 per cent.

This is the first time that bus and light rail passengers will benefit from discounted, off-peak fares.

Transport Minister Andrew Constance said that most passengers would benefit.

“The vast majority of commuters will benefit from these changes with either cheaper travel or no change to their fares. A third of commuters will save an average of $3.60 a week based on current travel patterns,” he said.

TFNSW will also waive the CPI increase and have not acted upon recommendations from the Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal (IPART) to increase fares by 20 per cent over four years.

The 50 per cent discount will run for three months, and then fares will shift back to 30 per cent for off peak travel, and bus and light rail passengers will be able to access the 30 per cent benefit.

“We want everyone to remember they have a role to play in making the public transport network as safe as possible. Our frontline transport staff have been doing an amazing job during this unprecedented time and we urge customers to keep showing them their respect and understanding,” said Constance.

A new all-day travel cap on Saturday and Sunday will also be set at $8.05 to help spread weekend public transport loads and encourage commuters to use public transport on the weekends.

Fares will increase on short bus and light rail journeys under three kilometres in the peak, to encourage active transport such as walking or cycling, as well as to try to shift commuters out of the peak periods.

Plan for new River Rail link to connect Sydney’s south and west

The Georges River Council is making the case for a new rail line linking Kogarah with Parramatta, via Bexley North and Bankstown.

The line, dubbed “River Rail” would provide a link between the T4 Illawarra Line, the T8 South Line, the T3 Liverpool Line, and the T1 Western line, all of which are currently only linked via the City Circle.

In a report released by the council, which stretches from Kogarah to Hurstville and Riverwood in Sydney’s south, the construction of a new corridor linking the area’s radial train lines would enable greater access to employment and education. Currently, the area has the lowest levels of public transport accessibility, with only 24 per cent of dwellings located within 30 minutes of a metropolitan centre via public transport.

The proposal, estimated to cost $10.5 billion, has an indicative alignment from Kogarah to Bexley North, with a new stop near Roselands before a connection at Bankstown, Chester Hill and Granville, via South Granville, and then terminating in Parramatta.

According to Mayor of Georges River Council Kevin Green, the new rail line would enable a true 30-minute city.

“The River Rail connection between Kogarah and Parramatta is a critical project which will transform the future of Sydney and the only way that the NSW State Government’s 30-minute city goal can be achieved for the South District,” said Greene.

“This vision, which strives to create a city where most residents live within 30 minutes of their jobs, education and health facilities, services and great places, requires investment in direct public transport links like the River Rail.”

The report highlights that without the link, there is little connection to the growing central river city, centred on Parramatta, for Sydney’s southern suburbs. The link would also enable further connections to the future parklands city and Aerotropolis.

Committee for Sydney CEO Gabriel Metcalf said that the proposed line would move Sydney’s network away from a radial network with the Sydney CBD as the main interchange.

“There has been much focus on the development and improvement of other areas of Sydney in recent years, such as the Aerotropolis in Western Sydney, and it is now time acknowledge and invest in the role of Sydney’s South District in our future city.”

Transport for NSW’s Future Transport 2056 Strategy indicates the connection between Hurstville and Parramatta as a “city-shaping corridor” but does not specify whether rail would be the preferred transport mode. In the Greater Sydney Commission’s Metropolis of Three Cities plan, the connection is identified as a train link investigation/visionary.