Lilydale

Works beginning on level crossing removal and parking upgrades on Lilydale line

Work to remove two level crossings on the Lilydale Line in Melbourne’s outer east will begin in December, the first of eight level crossings to go on the Belgrave and Lilydale lines.

The two level crossings are at Manchester Road in Mooroolbark and the Maroondah Highway in Lilydale. Thirteen crashes have occurred at the crossings with one fatality in the last decade.

As part of the level crossing removal, new stations will be built at Mooroolbark and Lilydale and a construction blitz will be held from December 11 to 20.

Foundations for new rail bridges will be installed, along with new underground cables. Another week long closure is indicatively scheduled for the end of summer in 2021.

“We’re not wasting a minute getting on with our critical works on the Lilydale line – delivering better transport connections for passengers and important local jobs for workers as we begin to recover from the pandemic,” said Minister for Transport Infrastructure Jacinta Allan.

Early works on a new multi-deck carpark at Mooroolbark station are already underway. The new carpark will add 450 new and upgraded spots at the station. A temporary carpark is now open to replace the existing carpark which is being redeveloped until 2022.

“Across the state we’re building more than 11,000 new and upgraded commuter parking spaces to make catching the train easier for everyone – and our new carpark at Mooroolbark will double the station’s current capacity,” said Minister for Public Transport Ben Carroll.

The new carpark includes lifts, CCTV, and better lighting, with community feedback providing input to the final design.

Once works are complete, the 53,000 vehicles that use the crossings each day will no longer have to wait while boom gates are down for up to a quarter of the two-hour morning peak.

The existing Mooroolbark station will be moved to the Yarra Valley Railway to continue the rail history of the heritage building.

Contract awarded for Crows Nest Metro station construction

The contract to build Crows Nest station, above the new Sydney CBD and South West Metro Line has been awarded.

AW Edwards will build the station, as well as two entrances, footpaths, lighting, retail space, improvements to pedestrian and cyclist safety, and enabling works for over-station developments.

Crows Nest is the first stop on the new line south of Chatswood and NSW Minister for Transport Andrew Constance said the service would change the way people get around in North Sydney.

“The new Crows Nest Station will transform how customers travel, with air-conditioned, driverless trains every four minutes in each direction in peak times,” Constance said.

“Hundreds of new jobs will be created throughout the life of the project, with more than 300 workers on site during peak phases of construction activity.”

The service will cut down times into the city, with current train travel from nearby St Leonards to Wynyard taking 14 minutes while it will take seven minutes from Crows Nest to Martin Place.

The station will be located 25 metres below ground in the excavated station cavern. Lifts and escalators will connect the two entrances, one on the Pacific Highway and one on Clarke Street, to the platforms.

Retail space will be created around the Clarke Street entry and in future along the Pacific Highway. Local transport connections including pedestrian crossings, bike parking and paths, kiss and ride, and point to point drop off points are also part of the project scope.

Once complete, the new station will provide metro rail access to surrounding residences, schools, and businesses, while creating a transport hub on the southern side of the St Leonards specialised centre.

Construction is expected to begin in January 2021 to be completed in 2023.

AW Edwards has previously built stations as part of the Epping to Chatswood line that is now part of the Metro North West Line.

A separate tender process will be held for the over-station developer. Further community feedback will be sought on the over-station development package.

Builder selected for Mandurah Station carpark

A builder for the Mandurah Station multi-storey carpark in WA has been selected.

Local builder PS Structures won the $32 million contract to replace the existing northern carpark with a 1,800 bay carpark.

According to a joint federal-state government statement, over 70 per cent of passengers at Mandurah station travel to the station by car, with the carpark reaching 90 per cent capacity by 9am on weekdays.

Both governments have been investing in rail services near Mandurah, south of Perth, with the beginning of a request for proposal process for a new station for nearby Lakelands announced recently.

“This project is yet another way we are continuing to invest in the southern suburbs, with the Lakelands Station project also set to begin this year, and planning for another at Karnup underway,” said WA Minister for Transport Rita Saffioti.

Federal Minister for Population, Cities and Urban Infrastructure Alan Tudge said that the expanded carpark would allow for greater train patronage.

“Together with a new station at Lakelands, this project will future-proof access to public transport for communities locally and across the Peel region,” said Tudge said.

“We also know the delivery of crucial infrastructure projects like the Mandurah is essential to supporting jobs and economic growth at this time.”

The Mandurah region has been targeted as an area for population growth, with the city forecast to grow by almost 50 per cent between 2016 and 2036. Enabling more people to use public transport will ensure the growth is managed, said federal Member for Canning, Andrew Hastie.

“The population of Mandurah and the Peel region have grown significantly over the last decade. The Government is delivering practical solutions that our community needs, both through this upgrade and construction of the new Lakelands station.”

The three level carpark will have lifts, a staircase, and a visually appealing façade, and a temporary carpark will be developed while construction is underway. Residents will also be encouraged to use alternative means, such as bus, cycling, or walking to get to the station.

Rooty Hill station upgrades increase accessibility

Station upgrades have been completed at Rooty Hill Station, in Western Sydney.

The station, located on the Main Western Line, now has four new lifts to make each platform accessible. Family accessible toilets have also been installed on each platform, said a transport for NSW spokesperson.

“The upgrade also includes a new pedestrian footbridge with new stairs to each platform, larger platform canopies for better weather protection and upgrades to CCTV and lighting to improve customer safety and security,” said the spokesperson.

In addition to the work on the station, a new commuter car park, with 750 car spaces, 16 accessible spaces, 10 motorcycle spaces, and 10 electric vehicle charging spaces, opened in early January.

Power for the vehicle charging ports will be locally sourced.

“The power requirements for these facilities are supplemented by sustainable features built into the car park design, including a rooftop solar system with 1140 solar panels. These also efficiently operate the car park lights and lift,’ said the TfNSW spokesperson.

Included in the upgrades are artworks produced by the local Aboriginal community, and pavers have been installed with the handprints of 450 school children from the local area.

The station’s heritage as the original terminus of the Western line’s extension to Blacktown, and its subsequent role in Sydney and NSW’s rail heritage is acknowledged in the station’s footbridge.

The upgrades to Rooty Hill station are part of TfNSW’s wider Transport Access Program, which is making stations more accessible around the state.

Consultation open on new Exhibition station

Consultation has begun on the redesign of Exhibition station in Brisbane, part of Queensland’s Cross River Rail Project.

The renovation of the station will see the station equipped to handle year round services, once the Cross River Rail project is completed. Currently, the station is normally only used during the Ekka show, held each August.

The redevelopment of Exhibition station and the surrounding precinct will involve a new 165 metre long island platform and canopy, as well as accessibility upgrades. Connections between the station and the surrounding area are also part of the upgrade.

Acting Minister for Cross River Rail Grace Grace, highlighted that the station will service surrounding institutions and growing suburbs in Brisbane’s north.

“Cross River Rail will deliver a new station at the RNA Showgrounds, providing year-round rail services for both the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, as well as the growing King Street lifestyle precinct,” she said.

Grace noted that the station’s redesign will allow for more frequent services.

“It will be open all year round for the growing number of residents, workers and visitors, who will benefit from the kind of ‘turn up and go’ public transport that Cross River Rail is designed to make possible.”

The new station will be served by a new fleet of dedicated rollingstock, and the Queensland government hopes that it will enable greater mode share by passenger rail in Brisbane.

“Travel to and from the four new underground Cross River Rail stations will be a matter of minutes, making access to one of Brisbane’s fastest growing inner-city suburbs easier than ever before,” said Grace.

“The construction of Cross River Rail will revolutionise our city, cutting down on travel times, taking thousands of cars off our roads and making access to Brisbane’s fastest growing inner-city suburb easier than ever before.”

Consultation is open until February 7.