Hydrogen

Hydrogen train test in the Netherlands meets all requirements

Hydrogen trains have met all four test requirements in a trial conducted in the Dutch province of Groningen.

Local operator Arriva trialled Alstom’s Coradia iLint trains, in partnership with railway infrastructure manager ProRail and energy company Engie over two weeks in March, 2020. The trains were tested on the line between Groningen and Leeuwarden.

The trial had four objectives for the hydrogen-powered trains: authorisation by the Dutch national safety assessor to run on the Dutch railway network; zero emissions in the commercial service of the current timetable; quick and easy refuelling; and familiarising the general public with hydrogen mobility.

On all four objectives, the trains met the requirements.

“The tests have demonstrated how our hydrogen train is mature in terms of availability and reliability, providing the same performance as diesel equipment, and with the benefit of low noise and zero emissions. The Coradia iLint hydrogen train supports the transition towards global sustainable transport systems,” said Bernard Belvaux, managing director, Alstom Benelux.

To meet the commercial service performance requirement, the trains were tested on an all stations service and an express timetable. The trains were tested on fuel consumption, compatibility with infrastructure, acceleration, braking, docking, and maximum speed. All went without a hitch.

During the trials, the trains were found to be significantly quieter than current diesel trains. Drivers were also familiarised with the trains and found them smooth, comfortable, and easy to drive.

Powered by hydrogen produced from renewable energy, refuelling went faster than expected and was conducted safely.

The Netherlands follows Germany in testing Alstom’s hydrogen-powered trainsets.

“After Germany, the Netherlands is the second country in Europe where the Alstom’s hydrogen train has proven itself a unique emissions-free solution for non-electrified lines,” said Belvaux.

Other trails and plans for implementation are being developed in Austria, Italy, and the UK.

Alstom to trial fully autonomous shunting in the Netherlands

French rail manufacturer Alstom has signed an agreement with Dutch infrastructure operator ProRail to test automatic shunting locomotives in 2021.

The tests aspire to a level 4 grade of automation (GoA4) where the trains will be fully automated, a first for shunting trains in the Netherlands.

Alstom will fit the automatic train operation (ATO) technology to diesel-hydraulic shunting locomotives owned by Lineas, the largest private rail freight operator in Europe. This technology will include automatic control technology, intelligence obstacle detection, and environment detection.

During the tests, train staff will remain aboard to ensure safety, however regular tasts such as starting and stopping, pushing wagons, controlling traction and brakes, and handling emergencies will be fully automated.

Bernard Belvaux, Alstom managing director for Benelux said that the trial would improve the operation of railways.

“This project is paving the way for fully digitalised railway. These tests will help the European rail system benefit from an increase in capacity, reduced energy consumption and cost while offering higher operational flexibility and improved punctuality. This test is fully in line with Alstom’s strategy to bring added value to our customers for smart and green mobility.”

Alstom has previously delivered ATO for metros around the world, including on the Sydney Metro, where the system also runs at a GoA4 level. This experience has enabled Alstom to demonstrate the benefits of an automated railway. By reducing headways and operating uniformly, automated trains can increase capacity, cut costs, and save energy.

ProRail has previously carried out tests with freight locomotives at GoA level 2, where a driver remains in control of doors and in the event of a disruption, with Alstom on a freight locomotive on the Betuweroute, a freight railway running from Rotterdam to Germany.

In May, Alstom announced that it would be trialling ATO on regional passenger trains in Germany in 2021.

Tests of hydrogen-powered train underway in Netherlands

The Netherlands has become the second country in Europe to run a hydrogen fuel cell train from rollingstock manufacturer Alstom.

The Coradia iLint will travel on 65km of track between Groningen and Leeuwarden, and will be the next location, after the Buxtehude–Bremervörde–Bremerhaven–Cuxhaven line in Germany, where hydrogen-powered trains will operate.

Ten days of testing have already been conducted in the Netherlands, and the trial follows the agreement signed last October between Alstom, the Province of Groningen, operator Arrive, Dutch railway infrastructure manager ProRail, and energy company Engie.

Hydrogen-powered trains are currently travelling at night without passengers at speeds of up to 140km/h.

The hydrogen supplied to the trains is ‘green’ hydrogen, produced with renewable energy supplied by Engie.

“The tests in the Netherlands demonstrate how our hydrogen train is mature in terms of availability and reliability, providing the same performance as traditional regional trains, but with the benefit of low noise and zero emissions. It is also easy to integrate in an existing fleet and is compliant with all safety regulations,” said Bernard Belvaux, managing director, Alstom Benelux.

Running on hydrogen means that the trains’ only emissions are water. The fuel cells combine hydrogen and oxygen into electricity to drive the train and the Coradia iLint is designed for sections of track that, lacking electrification, have had to be operated by diesel-powered trains. With equivalent performance as a traditionally-powered train set, the vehicle has a range of roughly 1,000km.

“The Coradia iLint hydrogen train is a reliable emission-free train ready to help transport us to a carbon-neutral Europe,” said Belvaux.