Construction begins on Bellevue railcar manufacturing site

Work has begun on the Bellevue manufacturing site, where Western Australia’s fleet of railcars will be built, tested, and maintained.

Part of the Metronet project, the $46 million facility will be where manufacturer Alstom will construct and maintain 246 C-series railcars, as well the replacement railcars for the Australind service.

Subiaco-based company, Firm Construction, will build the assembly and maintenance facility, as well as a high-voltage testing building. The 180m long building will include a railcar assembly area, offices, workshops and storage areas, two overhead cranes lifting 25t each, and a heavy maintenance railroad with a 10t capable crane.

“Today marks the start of the return of the railcar manufacturing industry to the Midland area,” said WA Premier Mark McGowan.

Under the terms of the agreement, 50 per cent of the total $1.25 billion contract will be delivered locally. The WA government estimates that 100 jobs will result from construction of the facility, with more jobs once production and maintenance begins.

“In a year from now, local workers will be standing in this very spot assembling Western Australia’s new Metronet railcars,” said McGowan.

The effects of the contract will also be felt more widely across the workforce.

“At the North Metropolitan TAFE campus, just down the road, our specialist Metronet Trade Training Centre will ensure local apprentices and trainees learn the skills for this important work,” said McGowan.

Once complete, the first of the C-series railcars are expected to run on the Perth network in 2022. Previously, railcars were manufactured in Midland up until 1994, when the Midland Railway Workshops closed down.

Transperth reduces speed of trains due to extreme heat

The temperature reached a top of 43 degrees in Perth on Tuesday, February 4 and train speeds were reduced to prevent distortion of steel tracks.

Transperth said in a social media post on Tuesday that “due to current temperatures heat restrictions are in place across the network”. 

The Transperth train network put temporary speed restrictions across the network when track-level temperatures reach 37 degrees. 

Trains are reduced by about 20kmh on the Fremantle, Midland, and Armadale line when the temperature hits 37 degrees and on the Mandurah, Joondalup, and Thornlie lines once the temperature reaches 39 degrees.

Train speeds are reduced by a further 10kmh if track temperatures reach 41 degrees, and when temperatures drop back below 37C and 39C respectively, the restrictions are lifted.

Western Australia Public Transport Authority (PTA) said in a statement that heat speed restrictions have been imposed every summer in Perth for more than 30 years.

“The impact was greatly reduced as the Public Transport Authority progressively replaced wooden sleepers with concrete,” WA PTA said.

“Track with concrete sleepers is much less affected by the heat. All the PTA’s mainline urban track has had concrete sleepers for several years.”

The restriction is in line with national and international operating and safety standards, that recognises that extreme weather can affect  steel track.

The WA PTA said heat-related speed restrictions are imposed around the world, while some countries also impose restrictions because of other climatic or environmental factors.

“Parts of Britain have speed restrictions in autumn if tracks are covered with leaves, which can affect traction,” they said.

Midland’s 51-year-old station will be replaced with a new 12,000sqm facility

A new METRONET train station will be built in Perth’s Eastern suburbs.

The McGowan Government has confirmed the relocation of Midland’s new train station will be between Helena and Cale streets.

The current 51-year-old station will be replaced with a new 12,000sqm railcar manufacturing and assembly facility.

The next stage of the project will focus on station layout and design in preparation for procurement and construction.

Transport Minister Rita Saffioti highlighted that the project will integrate transport modes and infrastructure.

“METRONET is not just about creating new rail lines, it’s also about reinvigorating existing stations and infrastructure to provide the community with well-designed places that support walking, cycling and public transport.”

The facility will feature three platforms, a new bus interchange, car park, bicycle facilities and a new shared path.

The Helena Street level crossing will close due to growth in freight rail operations and frequency of metro trains.

The crossing will be replaced with a new one at Cale Street and will connect through to Centennial Place.

The business case for the project has been submitted to Infrastructure Australia and the project definition plan will be completed in mid-2020.

Saffioti said the new Midland Station will make it easier for commuters, local businesses and residents to connect to public transport

“Relocating Midland Station has been high on the wish list of eastern suburbs locals for many years and it is now another step closer to becoming a reality,” Saffioti said.

The new station will be closer to the centre of Midland, Midland Health Campus, and the Workshops precinct.

Midland MLA Michelle Roberts said a new Midland train station has been needed for a long time.

“State of the art facilities, combined with a more central location will help boost train patronage and visitors to local businesses,” Roberts said.

Construction will start on the new manufacturing facility in Bellevue in the first half of this year.

Planning will continue for a future rail extension to Bellevue, which would be delivered in the next stage of the McGowan Government’s METRONET transformation of Perth’s rail network.