Parramatta

First tracks laid for Parramatta Light Rail in Westmead

Tracklaying has begun on the Parramatta Light Rail project with the first tracks laid at Hawkesbury Road in Westmead.

The bedding in of the 18 metre lengths of grooved rail marks a major milestone for the project, where early works have been underway for months preparing the route and identifying utilities ahead of construction.

Read more

Opal Travel

Opal Travel app to include real-time social distancing alerts

Transport for NSW will deliver real-time alerts for COVID-19-safe train travel through the Opal Travel app.

The alerts will enable passengers on Sydney Trains and Sydney Metro services to be alerted based on the capacity of the service they typically travel on, allowing commuters to make decisions to further social distancing.

The COVID-19 alerts are in addition to existing alerts on trackwork, delays, and major incidents.

NSW Minister for Transport Andrew Constance said that the function would further enable safe use of public transport.

“The new feature is a world leading piece of innovation that uses real-time capacity and predictive data to help customers make better choices when travelling,” said Constance.

“We have already implemented the green dots across the network, and the notifications are another way we can help maintain physical distancing and keep people COVID safe.”

The new function was rolled out to the app in just 12 weeks and utilised data that already existed.

The developers of the alert function hope that the feature will make passengers feel more comfortable and safer when using public transport.

The alerts have been personalised based on the user’s preferences, and further feedback is hoped to help improve the design.

The Opal Travel app was updated with real-time departure information for public transport in October, similar to the information displayed on screen as stations. Other information such as vehicle position, transfer information, as well as disruptions such as trackwork or delays are also now available through the app.

These function further integrate customer information within the Opal Travel app. While passengers were able to use third party apps for real time travel data, Opal payment functions were only accessible through the Opal Travel App.

The function is expected to roll out to light rail, ferry, and bus passengers in the near future.

Martin Place Station caverns completed ahead of schedule

The station caverns for the future Martin Place Metro Station have been completed, six months ahead of schedule.

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian and Minister for Transport Andrew Constance visited the site of the future station, 28 metres below ground and said that the completion of the caverns was a milestone in the delivery of the new Metro line.

“In a few short years, Sydney’s new driverless trains will be running through the heart of the city every few minutes – a fast, new, reliable and safe railway extending from the Metro North West Line,” said Berejiklian.

Constance said that with the shape of the future station coming together, critical infrastructure will be delivered soon.

“This is an extraordinary milestone: excavation, tunnelling and caverns completed – next stop is laying tracks and building the new station which will service the heart of the Sydney CBD,” said Constance.

Nine tunnels to allow commuters to access the station have been built as part of the station’s design. These connect from the station entrances as well as to the existing Martin Place station where passengers can connect to Sydney Trains services.

Under construction for the last two years, the station is located underneath Castlereagh and Elizabeth streets and are 220 metres long and 14 metres wide. Tunnel boring machines Nancy and Shirl arrived at the stations in October 2019 before continuing on the future line.

A total of 126,000 tonnes of rock were excavated to create the two caverns and 5,500 tonnes of steel and 21,5000 tonnes of concrete have been used to create the stations.

Tracklaying is expected to commence in early 2021.

Sydney Metro part of mental health awareness campaign

Sydney Metro workers have been part of the launch of a new initiative to reduce suicide in the construction sector.

MATES Stronger Together aims to drive cultural change in the construction industry, highlighting the shared responsibility that colleagues have for each other’s mental health.

“We know that construction workers are at significantly greater risk of suicide than workers in other industries, sadly a worker takes their life every two days,” said Constance.

“2020 has been one hell of a year, so it’s particularly important at the moment to do everything we can to safeguard the health, safety and wellbeing of our workers.”

The launch of MATES Stronger Together. Image credit: Sydney Metro

Six times the number of construction workers killed in workplace accidents take their own life, with 190 workers dying from suicide each year. Young workers are particularly at risk, with young workers in construction twice as likely to die from suicide as other young men.

MATES Stronger Together is run by MATES in Construction, a partnership between building companies, unions, employer grounds and mental health organisations.

Sydney Metro chief executive Jon Lamonte said that this year was a reminder of the importance of connection.

“If COVID-19 has taught us anything, it’s just how much we can take ‘connectedness’ for granted and how important our social connections really are,” Mr Lamonte said.

“Our ‘mates’ really do play an important role in preventing suicide in this industry.”

The program will provide practical tools for workers in the construction industry to identify warning signs and act, said MATES in Construction CEO Brad Parker.

“The goal is to create strong networks of support on construction projects across the country, with workers looking out for those suffering from suicidal thoughts and having the confidence to talk to them and connect them with the help they need.”

If you, or someone you know, is thinking about suicide or experiencing a personal crisis or distress, please seek help immediately in a life-threatening situation by calling 000 or seek support though one of these services:

Lifeline 13 11 14
Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467
NSW Mental Health Line 1800 011 511

Contract awarded for Crows Nest Metro station construction

The contract to build Crows Nest station, above the new Sydney CBD and South West Metro Line has been awarded.

AW Edwards will build the station, as well as two entrances, footpaths, lighting, retail space, improvements to pedestrian and cyclist safety, and enabling works for over-station developments.

Crows Nest is the first stop on the new line south of Chatswood and NSW Minister for Transport Andrew Constance said the service would change the way people get around in North Sydney.

“The new Crows Nest Station will transform how customers travel, with air-conditioned, driverless trains every four minutes in each direction in peak times,” Constance said.

“Hundreds of new jobs will be created throughout the life of the project, with more than 300 workers on site during peak phases of construction activity.”

The service will cut down times into the city, with current train travel from nearby St Leonards to Wynyard taking 14 minutes while it will take seven minutes from Crows Nest to Martin Place.

The station will be located 25 metres below ground in the excavated station cavern. Lifts and escalators will connect the two entrances, one on the Pacific Highway and one on Clarke Street, to the platforms.

Retail space will be created around the Clarke Street entry and in future along the Pacific Highway. Local transport connections including pedestrian crossings, bike parking and paths, kiss and ride, and point to point drop off points are also part of the project scope.

Once complete, the new station will provide metro rail access to surrounding residences, schools, and businesses, while creating a transport hub on the southern side of the St Leonards specialised centre.

Construction is expected to begin in January 2021 to be completed in 2023.

AW Edwards has previously built stations as part of the Epping to Chatswood line that is now part of the Metro North West Line.

A separate tender process will be held for the over-station developer. Further community feedback will be sought on the over-station development package.

EIS outlines station design, construction methods for Western Sydney Airport Metro

The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the future Sydney Metro – Western Sydney Airport has been released for public comment.

The release of the document paves the way for construction on the project to start before the end of 2020, said Federal Minister for Population, Cities and Urban Infrastructure Alan Tudge.

“Construction will start before the end of the year and will inject billions into the NSW economy and support 14,000 jobs,” he said.

“It’s crucial we get this underway right now to help NSW on the other side of COVID and deliver this game-changing, city-shaping infrastructure as soon as possible.”

NSW Minister for Transport Andrew Constance said that the future 23-km driverless metro would be a turn-up and go service.

“Trains will arrive up to every five minutes in the peak period in each direction as the initial operating capacity so customers won’t need a timetable – they’ll just turn up and go,” he said.

“There will be six new metro stations at St Marys, Orchard Hills, Luddenham, Airport Business Park, Western Sydney International Airport and the Western Sydney Aerotropolis.”

The EIS begins to give a clearer picture of what the line will look like. Three different types of stations will be constructed along the line, including cut and cover stations at St Marys, Airport Terminal and Aerotropolis, in cutting or surface states at Orchard hills and Airport Business Park, and an elevated station along a viaduct at Luddenham.

At St Marys the new station would be constructed alongside the existing train station to the south of the Western Line. Opportunities for the revitalisation of the surrounding station precinct would also be enabled by construction there.

The EIS outlines that two tunnels will be constructed as part of the project. One from St Marks to Orchard Hills, with a dive structure at Orchard Hills, and another from the Airport Business part to the Aerotropolis, with a dive structure near the airport business park.

Local federal member for Hume, Angus Taylor said that once complete, there would be opportunity to add more capacity to the line.

“We expect to be moving up to 7,740 people an hour in each direction when services start, with plenty of room to add more trains as the region grows,” Mr Taylor said.

“Passengers will enjoy a five-minute journey from the airport to the Western Sydney Aerotropolis. It will take around 20 minutes to travel from St Marys to the Aerotropolis and about 15 minutes from the airport to St Marys – where customers can interchange with the T1 Western Line and the rest of Sydney’s rail network.”

First train arrives at Kangy Angy Maintenance Facility

The first train of the New Intercity Fleet has travelled to the Kangy Angy Maintenance facility on the NSW Central Coast from Sydney.

The journey is part of the testing phase of the new fleet of 55 10 car trains and is one of the first of many trips to the Central Coast that the fleet will make, said local member Adam Crouch.

“The Central Coast and Newcastle Line will be the first in NSW to benefit from the New Intercity Fleet, which will deliver safer, more accessible and comfortable journeys,” Crouch said.

“The 24-hour-run Kangy Angy Maintenance Facility was purpose-built for the New Intercity Fleet, where the trains will be washed, maintained and serviced. It is close to 500,000 square metres in size, has about six kilometres of electric rail lines, a new rail bridge and offices and amenities for staff.”

The maintenance facility was completed in late August and was constructed by John Holland. UGL Rail will operate the facility as part of the RailConnect consortium which has built and designed and will maintain the fleet.

There are currently the trains from the New Intercity Fleet that are undergoing testing ahead of a larger roll-out later in 2020. The Central Coast and Newcastle Line will be the first line to have the fleet introduced into passenger service.

The New Intercity Fleet replace the V-set trains and come with accessibility and comfort upgrades, said NSW Minister for Transport Andrew Constance.

“Customers on the New Intercity Fleet will enjoy more spacious two-by-two seating, mobile device charging ports, modern heating and air conditioning, and dedicated spaces for luggage, prams and bicycles,” Constance said.

“Automatic Selective Door Operation, obstruction detection and traction interlocking are just some of the safety features on these new trains.”

Minister for Regional Transport and Roads Paul Toole said the trains are hoped to make public transport preferred for regional residents.

“These new trains are fully accessible for our less mobile customers, building upon our vision to help make public transport a first-choice option for people living in the regions,” said Toole.

New Intercity Fleet reach Lithgow after Blue Mountains Line upgrades

Testing of the New Intercity Fleet has seen the electric trains reach Lithgow, the first new electric train to do so since the final V-Set was introduced.

Until recently, newer regional electric trains such as the Oscar train sets and the Tangara fleet have not been able to travel past Springwood due to limitations on the line.

Tight bends and narrow tunnels mean that only Narrow Electric standard rollingstock have been able to travel west of Springwood, meaning V-Sets were the only regional trains to take passengers further.

Engineering works to widen the line and extend platforms mean that the new trains are now able to run to Lithgow, said Minister for Regional Transport and Roads Paul Toole.

“This is such an exciting development for the thousands of customers who travel between the city and these areas, particularly for Lithgow customers because it has only been made possible due to upgrades on the Blue Mountains Line,” he said.

Running the trains to Lithgow is part of the testing of the New Intercity Fleet before they enter passenger service later this year. The trains will first travel on the Central Coast and Newcastle lines, before the Blue Mountains and South Coast lines.

“Over the next few months we’ll see more of these trains tested on the Blue Mountains Line, mostly at night and on weekends,” said Toole.

Minister for Transport Andrew Constance said the new trains had a number of upgraded features.

“Customers on the New Intercity Fleet will enjoy more spacious two-by-two seating, mobile device charging ports, modern heating and air conditioning, and dedicated spaces for luggage, prams and bicycles,” Constance said.

“Automatic Selective Door Operation, obstruction detection and traction interlocking are just some of the safety features on these new trains.”

Unions have expressed concerns about the operation of doors on the trains, with guards unable to open their doors before the rest of the train doors.