Brittany Coles

Final stage of Sydney’s CBD light rail opens

The 12-kilometre Sydney CBD and South East Light Rail network is now complete and operational.

Passenger services are now running on the new L3 Kingsford Line between Circular Quay and Kingsford.

The first passenger tram departed Juniors Kingsford at 5am Friday, April 3 and services on the line will run until 1am on Saturday morning.

This is the second part of the $2.9 billion CBD and South East Light Rail project, which began operating between Circular Quay and Randwick four months ago.

Sydney Light Rail stated that operations will be fine-tuned over a period of time as the L3 Kingsford Line is integrated with the L2 Randwick Line and while services are bedded down.

“With light rail running down Anzac Parade through Kensington and Kingsford, it is vital all road users follow traffic signals and for pedestrians in particular to be aware that there are two-stage crossings to connect to the light rail stops,” Sydney Light Rail said in a statement.

NSW Minister for Transport Andrew Constance didn’t attend the opening due to travel restrictions and opened the line remotely via video message.

“Opening the Kingsford leg is an important completion of the project,” Constance said in his virtual message.

“It’s not a time to get on the light rail for fun.”

Transport for NSW stated that the opening of the new line is focused on benefiting passengers who need to undertake essential travel, giving them another option.

The opening of the new line provides public transport for workers and the community in the south east as it services the important health precinct and the city.

From 4 April 2020, trams on both the L2 Randwick Line and L3 Kingsford Line will operate between 5am and 1am, with weekday services between 7am and 7pm running every 4-8 minutes in the CBD and every 8-12 minutes in the South East.

In Parramatta, work is continuing on the construction of the light rail line there. As construction of public transport is deemed an essential service, the project is progressing as planned.

Heritage-listed tree saved at a Melbourne train station

Metro Trains has confirmed that urgent works will commence at Newmarket Station in Inner Melbourne, including saving the river red gum and peppercorn trees.

Catherine Baxter, Metro Chief Operating Officer said works will commence next week to secure the station’s structure and protect the historic buildings into the future.

“We’ve listened to community feedback and are working closely with Council on plans to protect the heritage station and improve the precinct for years to come,” she said.

Moonee Valley City Council said it has worked with Metro to save the heritage-listed river red gum and a peppercorn tree at Newmarket Station.

“Metro has listened to our concerns and will save the significant tree, working around it to make the station and platform safe,” the Council said in a statement.

One pittosporum tree will be removed under the Rail Management Act. Council and Metro have agreed this needs to happen straight away for platform upgrades to take place.

Metro stated that the ageing Newmarket station platforms and retaining walls will be rebuilt. Works will take place over the next six weeks.

A bespoke engineering solution has been designed to save the two trees so they continue to provide shelter, amenity, and biodiversity for the local community.

Metro said in a statement that they have agreed with Council that following further detailed arborist and engineering assessments, one pittosporum tree, which is an invasive weed species, on the eastern side of the station must be removed to allow for the urgent works to proceed.

Moonee Valley City Council said Metro will apply for planning approval to remove any other trees at the station in order to maintain safety or do key works.

Metro stated that it advised Council that no other trees will be removed without planning permission unless it is determined that a tree poses an immediate safety risk to users of the station precinct.

Further analysis is being done by Metro in relation to trees and platform safety on the Pin Oak Crescent side of the station.

Metro and Council continue to work on landscaping and replanting plans for the Pin Oak Crescent side of the station and will work together to implement additional safety measures based on expert advice as required.

“The safety of the community and our passengers remains our absolute priority,” Baxter said.

Payments fast-tracked for NZ transport contractors

The New Zealand Government is paying transport contractors in advance to enable suppliers to retain their workforces.

Phil Twyford, NZ Transport Minister announced on Wednesday April 1 that the decision to bring payments forward will provide financial relief for the transport sector throughout the four-week lockdown period.

He said the Advanced Entitlement Payment (AEP) will ensure the sector can quickly re-start work and be in a strong position to respond to any future Government infrastructure packages in the post-lockdown economy.

“Making sure we can build more critical infrastructure as soon as possible will help stimulate the economy and help New Zealand make up its infrastructure deficit,” Twyford said.

The NZ Transport Agency is also continuing planning and design work so that more projects are ready to move to construction as soon as works can resume.

The NZ Transport Agency is now offering a support package for non-essential services, with advance payments being made available to contractors who currently have projects in construction. 

The AEP will be available to contractors who currently have National Land Transport Programme funded projects in construction with the NZ Transport Agency.  

Earlier this month the NZ government announced it will invest a record $54 billion (AUD$53.5) in land transport.

Twyford said this transport investment will make a real difference to New Zealand’s economic recovery.

The draft Government Policy Statement (GPS) 2021 will guide the Transport Agency to invest more than $4.5 billion a year raised through the National Land Transport Fund and allocate required funding towards rail and public transport.

The Ministry of Transport is inviting stakeholders and the wider public to give feedback on the draft GPS until 5pm, Monday, 27 April 2020.

Alstom driverless trains decision overturned by Federal court

Alstom Transport Australia has won a decision in the Federal court allowing it to import driverless trains free of tariffs.

On March 17, the Federal Court of Australia overturned a decision by the Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT) that a driverless train can be put to the same use as a driver operated train.

The Federal court hearing took place on 24 February. The court ordered that the appeal by Alstom be allowed and the matter be remitted to the Tribunal for re-determination according to law. This allows Alstom to avoid the tariff of five per cent on rollingstock imported into Australia.

The AAT had affirmed a decision made by the Comptroller-General of Customs to refuse an application made by Alstom for a Tariff Concession Order (TCO).

A TCO can be sought by a company which wishes to import a product where there are no substitutable goods  manufactured in Australia. Alstom sought the TCO to covered driverless trains with seven further specifications.

Alstom said that as the use of the imported goods was “to transport passengers on a high capacity, high frequency, driverless metropolitan train line system”, there was not a substitutable product manufactured in Australia.

Customs and the AAT said Alstom’s use of the substitutable goods was too specific and the AAT held that driver operated versus driverless trains was an issue of how the use was performed, as the tribunal found that the relevant use was transportation of passengers by train.

The Full Federal Court disagreed with the finding of the AAT, writing that the AAT merely identified the use of a “passenger train”. 

Russell Wiese, customs and global trade partner at Hunt & Hunt Lawyers said Alstom sought a TCO over a particular type of passenger train.

“In this case, it was not just any train over which a TCO was sought. It was a driverless train with 7 further specifications,” Wiese said.

“As the AAT took too wide an approach, the matter has been sent back to the AAT to be reheard.”

The Court made note of the fact that Customs had screened the TCO application and did not reject the wording as being too specific.

Alstom was approached for comment but declined as the matter is ongoing.

COVID-19 stimulus package: what it means for businesses in rail

The federal government has announced a $17.6 billion economic plan to keep Australian businesses in business, so what does this mean for the rail sector?

As the entire global economy faces significant challenges posed by the spread of the coronavirus, stimulus packages have been implemented across the nation to support small and medium sized businesses.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said as part of the plan up to 6.5 million individuals and 3.5 million businesses would be directly supported by the package.

Caroline Wilkie, Australasian Railway Association (ARA) CEO said stimulus measures announced by the New Zealand, Australian commonwealth and state governments for small and medium enterprises, such as direct payments, asset write offs, apprentice wage subsidies, accelerated depreciation, and payroll tax exemptions will be of benefit to eligible businesses in the rail supply chain.

“However it is likely that additional government support will be necessary,” she said.

Similarly, Luke Wisbey manager – rail for civil engineering and plant hire company Brefni, noted that there is room for current stimulus measures to go further.

“The $17bn support package offered by the Federal Government is quite a significant sum and highlights the enormity of the situation facing business across all sectors including the rail industry,” said Wisbey.

“Although the package offered is substantial, the individual initiatives represent relatively small spends at a time when the economy faces mass bankruptcies. In order for businesses to survive the likely drops in revenue the crisis will generate, the government needs to be considering corporate level funding rather than ad hoc initiatives.”

Wilkie said passenger rail operators are reporting significant reductions in patronage and visible social distancing between customers on Australian and New Zealand rail networks.

At this stage, services have not been reduced. Other ARA members across the freight, contractor and supply chain are also reporting challenging conditions.

“ARA is uniting its members across all sectors of the industry to collectively address the COVID-19 situation and continues to work with our members to assess the industry impact and to engage with the government on areas where assistance can provide the most benefit,” Wilkie said.

What financial support is available?

The federal government will invest $6.7bn to boost tax-free cash flow for employers. The payment will provide cash flow support to businesses with a turnover of less than $50m that employ staff from the beginning of this year to June.

Up to $25,000 is available to help pay wages or for investment to protect against a downturn in activity.

Businesses with turnover less than $500m will be able to access a 15 month investment incentive by accelerating depreciation deductions. These businesses are also eligible for an expanded instant asset write-off for asset investments of up to $150,000. 

Similar to the relief provided following the bushfires, the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) will provide administrative relief for certain tax obligations on a case-by-case basis. 

If you’re a quarterly pay as you go (PAYG) instalments payer you can vary your PAYG instalments on your activity statement for the March 2020 quarter. Wisbey noted that thresholds here limit the amount of available assistance,

“The 50 per cent allowance on PAYG capped at $25,000 limits the target pool and those companies still need to pay net wages and super. For SME businesses, support with wages are of most concern. We support the wage assistance initiative for apprentices and trainees.”

What about investment in my business?

From March 12, businesses with a turnover of less than $500m will be able to deduct 50 per cent of the cost of an eligible asset on installation, with existing depreciation rules applying to the balance of the asset cost.

A time-limited 15 month investment incentive to support business investment and economic growth over the short term, by accelerating depreciation deductions. 

How will my state support my business?

State governments across Australia have announced their own stimulus packages which includes state support for the waiver of payroll tax, fees and charges for businesses, and additional maintenance and cleaners of transport assets.  

In NSW, the state government has announced that more than $250m will be invested to employ additional cleaners of public infrastructure, including TfNSW’s external operators statewide. This is in addition to the $450m for the waiver of payroll tax for businesses with payrolls of up to $10m for three months and raising the threshold limit to $1m in 2020-21.

Thresholds here also exclude some businesses, highlighted Wisbey.

“The proposed NSW holiday on Payroll tax is good and should be extended until the end of the year at least. The threshold has also been lifted to $1m before it kicks in. However, this is an absolute tax on employment & the threshold should be north of $5m to be more effective.”

The Queensland government will create a new $500m loan facility, interest free for the first 12 months, to support businesses to keep Queenslanders in work and extend the coronavirus payroll tax deferral to all businesses across the state.

Western Australia’s state government stimulus package includes $114 million in measures to support Western Australian small and medium businesses.

Ben Wyatt, WA Treasurer said “the state government’s stimulus package works hand in glove with the commonwealth government, and ensures these additional measures complement the stimulus announced by the Prime Minister last week.”

Specific state and territory information and assistance for businesses can be found on the federal government’s website.

$54b will be invested in New Zealand transport

The New Zealand government will invest a record $54 billion (AUD$53.5) in land transport.

Part of the government’s Draft Government Policy Statement (GPS) 2021, over the next decade billions of dollars will be committed to improve transport infrastructure.

The GPS is how the government guides Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency to invest more than $4.5 billion a year raised through the National Land Transport Fund. It guides the agency to allocate funding towards rail and public transport.

Transport Minister Phil Twyford said this transport investment will make a real difference to New Zealand’s economic recovery.

“The Draft GPS 2021 signals that we will make a record investment in transport of $48 billion on top of our $6.8 billion from the NZ Upgrade Programme, which will help give the transport construction industry certainty during the current global economic headwinds,” he said.

“Given how both rail and coastal shipping help take pressure off our roads and produce less emissions, we are looking to fund both in GPS 2021.”

Twyford said building alternative transport options for people and freight is a vital part of achieving the Government’s goal of net zero emissions by 2050.

The announcement follows the new Hamilton to Auckland passenger train service that has received funding through the NZ Transport Agency for five years.

From August 3 this year, the Te Huia service will consist of two morning trains from Hamilton, with two return evening trains each week day and a single return train on Saturday.

Twyford said the new service is part of a wider government vision to enable development along the Hamilton-Auckland growth corridor.

“Our government is already investing $618 million to electrify the rail lines in South Auckland out to Pukekohe and build railway stations in Drury, which will support a whole new future town there,” he said.

The Ministry of Transport also has work underway to investigate options for rapid rail between Hamilton and Auckland.

The federal budget 2019 provided a $1 billion funding boost to support a long overdue revitalisation of rail and work has already started on the $196 million Wellington commuter rail upgrades. 

The Government is now seeking feedback from local government, the transport sector, community groups and the wider public on the draft GPS 2021.

Engagement on the draft GPS closes 27 April 2020.

Rail operators are ramping up hygiene to combat COVID-19 transmission

Major Australian rail operators are helping authorities minimise the spread of COVID-19 by seriously ramping up hygiene and cleaning protocols.

Current advice from the Australian Department of Health is that everyone in the community should go about their business as usual, unless they have travelled from a country or region with a high or moderate risk of COVID-19, or have had contact with a confirmed case of coronavirus. There is no need to take actions like limiting movement on public transport.

State government agencies including Transport for NSW (TfNSW), Queensland Rail, Victoria Department of Transport (DoT), Transport Canberra, South Australian Public Transport Authority (SAPTA), Western Australia Public Transport Authority (PTA) are advising rail operators around the nation to take extra precautions and maintain good hygiene practices for both employees and passengers.

On Tuesday, March 17 the NSW government announced that part of the $2.3 billion economic stimulus, $250 million will be invested to employ additional cleaners of public infrastructure, which includes TfNSW’s external operators statewide.

Cleaning squads have been deployed across NSW trains, light rail, and the metro, particularly in high-traffic areas including Central, Town Hall, and Wynard.

TfNSW is encouraging customers to use Opal and contactless payments where possible, to further reduce chances of community spread and safeguard staff.

Andrew Constance, NSW Minister for Transport said while staff have boosted maintenance and cleaning efforts on the network in response to COVID-19, customers need to take extra precautions too.

“For those services that do not offer contactless payment, we are advising all frontline staff to wash their hands and use hand sanitiser to limit the spread of viruses,” he said.

Jeroen Weimar, head of transport services Victoria said we’ve all got a part to play in responding to the significant challenge presented by COVID-19.

A Victorian DoT spokesperson said all operators on the state’s network have been asked to activate their increased cleaning protocols which will be rolled out in the coming days.

The increased cleaning measures mean all carriages on Metro Trains and V/Line trains will undergo nightly sanitation, and Melbourne’s trams will undergo a deep clean before each service.

A TransLink spokesperson said it  is working behind the scenes in preparation and have plans in place to respond to any recommendations from Queensland Health.

Gold Coast trams have already moved to daily sanitised cleans, and Queensland Rail will boost dedicated cleaning staff, ramping up regular cleaning measures and beginning a new disinfecting process on South East Queensland commuter trains from Tuesday, March 17.

Queensland Rail has stated in an update that it has strict maintenance and cleanliness standards for its trains and stations to ensure the comfort and safety of customers and employees. 

SAPTA has also increased cleaning schedules and extra crew are being used across all modes with particular focus being given to hard surfaces such as handrails, validators and push buttons. 

Stephan Knoll, SA Minister for Transport and Infrastructure said the safety of passengers and staff remains the highest priority. 

“We are taking these additional measures to help protect South Australians who deliver and rely on public transport to get to work or go about their daily lives,” said Knoll. 

Transport Canberra said there have been no changes made to public transport, and all governments are working together to ensure a national approach.

“We are implementing an increased cleaning regime on our light rail vehicles as well as at high-traffic areas such as stops and interchanges,” Transport Canberra stated.

Chris Steel, ACT Minister for Transport said the state government has engaged Robson Environmental to undertake a study to make any further recommendations on Transport Canberra’s cleaning practices.

Rita Saffioti, WA Transport Minister said along with other state transport agencies, Transperth trains have transitioned from getting a basic daily clean each night to a full daily sanitation.

“So far there is no evidence of community transmission in WA, and the increased cleaning regime is intended to reduce the risk – as much as practical – against potential exposure,” Saffioti said.

Across the Tasman in New Zealand, Auckland Transport have been quick to adopt similar health and safety initiatives to those that have been put in place by Australian transport operators.

Auckland Transport (AT) advised in a statement that the NZ Ministry of Health has made it clear that there are no issues with people using trains.

“While many Aucklanders are working from home during this time of uncertainty, those continuing to use public transport should use good hygiene practices,” Auckland Transport stated.

Phil Goff, Auckland Mayor, said AT is well-prepared for a possible escalation of its COVID-19 response and has taken steps including installing new public hand sanitiser stations and has increased the cleaning of vehicles and facilities.

Shane Ellison, Auckland Transport chief executive, said AT are making sure information and advice from the NZ Ministry of Health on preventive measures is being supplied to its staff, operators, and contractors.

AT have created a COVID-19 update section on its website, as have most rail operators and state transport departments in Australia, to inform staff and passengers with the latest information.

The barcode revolution: Standardising the industry

Thermit Australia’s Andrew Carter tells Rail Express how the company is implementing GS1 data standards and why global standards should be part of normal business.

As technological initiatives coordinate the Australian rail sector, the global standards that shape the entire industry will allow organisations to realise significant benefits as they streamline their operations. That’s why the Board of the Australasian Railway Association (ARA) is encouraging the implementation of GS1 global data standards across the Australasian rail industry to prepare it for its digital future.

For Andrew Carter, operations manager at Thermit Australia, suppliers of aluminothermic welding and glued insulated joints, it was a no brainer to start implementing GS1 standards and realise the vision towards a national approach of rail technology.

Carter has been involved in businesses that supply to the rail industry for the past 20 years. He took on a new role at Thermit Australia five years ago to manage operational interests. Carter has seen the industry evolve over the years, however, the biggest change to digitalisation in operations at the company occurred two years ago, when regional Victorian operator V/Line requested

Thermit to implement GS1 barcoding in 2018. Thermit Australia is one of 24 companies within the global Goldschmidt Thermit Group – a supplier of products and services for railway tracks. In the group’s 120 years of operation, this global standard had never been implemented before.

The Australian company was the first business across the international group to adopt GS1 barcoding. Initially looking to implement the standard as a standalone company within the Goldschmidt Thermit Group, the head office in Germany had also been investigating implementing GS1 standards across all of the group companies.

MODIFYING AND IMPROVING OPERATION
The Australasian Railway Association (ARA) is encouraging the industry to act on digital capabilities and automation of operational processes by using GS1 global data standards.

The ARA resolved for 2019 to be the year of building rail’s digital capability through a transformational joint initiative with GS1 called Project i-TRACE. The ARA and GS1 established an i-TRACE working group to help support the ambitious goal of rapid adoption of standardising the entire industry.

Thermit Australia had already implemented the GS1 standards, spearheading this initiative a whole year before the 2019 Project i-TRACE action plan.

Two years before V/Line had discussions with the ARA to adopt GS1 standards, the Victorian government-owned corporation was already having significant issues around tracking critical spares in the inventory of the company’s maintenance groups and project works.

V/Line consulted Thermit Australia to help standardise the identification (codification) and barcode labelling of stock to help fast track the management of inventory at V/Line’s main warehouse in Lara and the company’s additional 33 inventory depots across Victoria.

V/Line was the first customer that Thermit Australia had that wanted the introduction of GS1 standards, so the company had to undergo operational changes to its welding consumables labelling in order to meet V/Line’s product requests.

Carter said implementing a new system meant facing new challenges, but Carter said GS1 Australia assisted Thermit in understanding the practices for standards in the industry and building the system to improve data quality and barcoding.

“We knew we needed to adopt a GS1 coding based on a group wide format, so the key aspects of the project were to implement the Global Trade Item Number (GTIN) labelling on products for our customers, with V/Line being the first.”

Carter said throughout the initial process of modifying operations to comply with GS1 standards, V/Line provided valuable feedback to Thermit, ensuring the company can providing a suitable format that meets their requirements.

Thermit Australia had minor modifications during the implementation stage, sending V/Line prototype labels for review before supplying the final GS1 barcoded products, said Carter.

“We didn’t have to worry about V/Line coming back to us saying our barcoding wasn’t in line with their expectations as we engaged with GS1 the whole way through the first implementation stage,” he said.

Carter said the open collaboration between V/Line and GS1 Australia helped Thermit refine the style and format of labelling, according to the guidelines.

“GS1 Australia were of great assistance to help us implement the new barcoding guidelines, they would look at what we produced and then we created prototypes and got valuable feedback from V/Line.

“The first trial run of product with labels was sent to V/Line at the end of January 2019. Following feedback, some modifications were made and finalised at the end of March 2019 to provide them the efficiency they wanted through product handling,” Carter said.

“I’m very happy we’ve been proactive in embracing the GS1 barcoding standards as a supplier to the rail industry. It was an expectation in V/Line’s contract requirements and it potentially is a tender advantage as more requests for GS1 barcoding are rising within the industry.

“Once we implemented the barcoding with V/Line we have rolled it out to every customer that continues to request it, expanding our GS1 labelling process to major passenger rail networks including Metro Trains, Sydney Trains, and Queensland Rail.”

DRIVING TOWARDS DIGITALISATION

Carter said engaging with GS1 standards meant developing IT systems that aligned with the standard’s automating operational procedures.

Thermit Australia has two operational sites located in Somersby, NSW and Clontarf in QLD. Somersby was the initial facility using the barcoding standard as the site manufactures and provides welding consumables and implementation.

“The existing label generation at Somersby was a standalone system that required the manual transfer of data from our Navision ERP system into the label creation software,” Carter said.

“We decided to make this process more efficient and looked into having the ERP software send data automatically to the label software to generate the new GS1 compliant labels.”

After the company engaged its inhouse and external ERP software consultant, along with label manufacturer Wedderburn, Thermit Australia established that a new label generation software was required.

The new software, called Bartender, was compatible with the company’s existing label printing hardware, making the implementation process smoother, Carter explained.

“Our ERP system needed to be customised to allow the capture and transfer of the required data to the Bartender software,” he said.

By the end of June 2019, the new GS1 compliant product identification labelling was rolled out, with all customers receiving GTIN labels on the weld kits.

Since then, work has been commencing on adding GS1 barcoding to other products, with the first crucibles to be supplied to the market early this year.

Carter said the Clontarf site where labels are manufactured to be attached to the rail and installed in track will catch up in time.

At Clontarf, the existing product label is an aluminium tag with stamped data, and through the second half of 2019 Thermit investigated options to find a solution to add the GS1 data to the aluminium tag, Carter said.

“Dot peening was pursued with a new supplier and samples were sent to GS1 Australia and V/Line for assessment, they provided positive feedback however there were reliability issues reading the tags in different lighting environments.

“The readability of the dot peen on the aluminium is not satisfactory for the scanners that are already being used by our customers, so we are currently looking at a alternative materials instead and this work is ongoing.” Carter predicts over time the rail industry will more broadly see the benefits of adopting global standards, staying ahead and being up to speed with current standards has improved the efficiency of operations at Thermit Australia.

“This implementation project is driven by the industry and remains a key priority for us, so we will continue to endeavour to meet the requirements of our customers.”

Viterra doubles the size of typical rail movement

Michael Hill, Viterra Operations Manager said it’s the first time Viterra has loaded a 100-wagon train to service interstate demand for South Australian grain. 

Viterra has loaded its largest single rail outturn in response to domestic and international demand.

The 100-wagon train loaded with barley from Viterra’s Crystal Brook, Snowtown, and Gladstone sites, is headed for interstate feedlots.

Hill said the interstate service has effectively doubled the size of a typical rail movement, reflecting the fast rate that South Australian grain is moving.

“We have around 40 buyers in the Viterra system purchasing grain for the domestic and export market, and we’ve seen a significant increase in shipping and rail outturns compared to this time last year,” Hill said.

In addition to the 100-wagon train, Viterra has loaded a further six domestic-bound trains during the same week from sites in its central region with wheat, barley, and canola.

“We’re also continuing to service strong export demand, outturning grain by vessels through our port terminals to various international buyers and markets,” Hill said.

All six of Viterra’s port terminals across the state are loading vessels over March and April with wheat, barley, and canola headed to a range of domestic and export markets.

“We are focused on working with buyers to make it as easy as possible for them to continue accessing grain through the Viterra network and getting it to where they need it,” Hill said.

Dual multimillion dollar contracts awarded for rail upgrades in south east Melbourne

Two contracts have been announced to begin work on improving rail connections in south east Melbourne.

The Level Crossing Removal Project announced that the duplication of the Cranbourne Line between Cranbourne and Dandenong will be carried out by two alliances.

The first alliance will bring together McConnell Dowell, Arup, Mott MacDonald, and Metro Trains Melbourne, for the section of track between Dandenong and Lynbrook. This contract will also involved the removal of the Greens Road level crossing in Dandenong South.

The second alliance will complete the track duplication between Lynbrooke and Cranbourne. This alliance comprises Laing O’Rouke, Jacobs, and Metro Trains Melbourne. The grouping will also build a new Merinda Park station and increase the size of the car park at Lynbrooke Station.

Victorian Minister for Transport Infrastructure Jacinta Allan said that the work formed part of a larger suite of works.

“With 11 level crossings already removed along the Cranbourne line, we’re getting on with delivering better services to more people in Melbourne’s growing south east.”

Works on the line duplication, new station, and level crossing removal will be completed by 2025 and allow for a future rail extension to Clyde. Services will be able to run up to every 10 minutes and once the Metro Tunnel is complete, new high-capacity trains will be able to transport 121,000 extra peak hour passengers per week on the Cranbourne and Pakenham lines.

“The Cranbourne Line Upgrade is just one of a suite of major road and rail projects easing congestion, improving safety and making journeys more reliable in the south-east,” said Member for Cranbourne Pauline Richards.

According to program director, Steve Brown, the authority has been looking to get started on these major works.

“These projects are a huge priority for us, and we’ve been working hard to make sure they can start as soon as possible.”

In a separate announcement, the Level Crossing Removal Authority advised that a level crossing in Melbourne’s major commercial and industrial area will be removed in mid 2020 with the construction contract signed.

The contract will be delivered by an alliance of Fulton Hogan and Metro Trains Melbourne.

Early works to begin the South Gippsland Highway, Dandenong South level crossing removal are set to start soon.

The level crossing will be removed and replaced with a road bridge over the rail line.

Early works will include site establishment on South Gippsland Highway and underground services relocation.

Major works in mid 2020 will involved the construction of the new road bridge and the replacement of the busy intersection at South Gippsland Highway and Princes Highway with a fully signalised T-intersection.

A level crossing removal project (LCRP) spokesperson said LCRP will work to minimise local disruptions or community impacts while these works take place.