Brittany Coles

T6 Carlingford Line permanently closes for construction

Parramatta Light Rail and Sydney Trains commenced decommissioning works on the T6 Carlingford Line on January 5 as part of its conversion to dual-track light rail last Sunday.

The Parramatta Light Rail team are currently undertaking decommissioning works on the rail track at Clyde Station and near the Parramatta Road intersection at Granville for the next few weeks. 

The $2.4 billion Parramatta Light Rail will connect Westmead to Carlingford via the Parramatta CBD and Camellia

From January 10th the high priority has been piling works, installing rail signage, and assembling construction cable routes and pulling at Rosehill Station to Clyde Station within the rail corridor.

24/7 operation works will commence between January 18 and 19 that will involve track removal, construction of concrete wall, rail cutting and welding, and reconfiguration work at the level crossing on Parramatta Road.

Parramatta Light Rail said equipment will include, but is not limited to, concrete saws, boring machines, jackhammers, compactors, power tools, trucks, light vehicles, light towers, and vacuum excavation trucks.  

Member for Parramatta Geoff Lee said Greater Parramatta will see new light rail bridges built, 60,000 tonnes of concrete poured, and more than 215,000 tonnes of earth moved to make way for the Parramatta Light Rail.

Hi-rail equipment will include excavators, dump trucks, and elevated work platforms. 

“The community will start to see work ramping up with fencing and hoardings installed along the future light rail route, and construction sites established,” Lee said.

Decommissioning works are due to conclude at the end of the month.

Over 1,000 people attended a farewell event hosted by Sydney Trains and Transport Heritage NSW to ride a historic Red Set F1 before the closure of the rail tracks on January 5th.

The light rail is expected to open in 2023 and transport around 28,000 people through the Parramatta CBD every day. 

Moree Inland Rail regional office announces first Regional Liaison Officer

The first Inland Rail Regional Liaison Officer has been assigned to the lead the Moree Inland Rail regional office. 

The Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Cities and Regional Development appointed the position to long-time local resident Angela Doering.

Doering will work with communities and local businesses based from Narrabri in New South Wales to the Queensland border to help people benefit from Inland Rail. 

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development, Michael McCormack said it’s vital that we have specialist expertise working with businesses and local communities. 

“Inland Rail is expected to support 5,000 jobs in New South Wales and provide a boost of more than $2.5 billion to the state economy,” McCormack said.

“This office will provide the opportunity for Moree and surrounding communities to talk directly to Government about regional development outcomes and economic opportunities available ahead of the construction of the next section of Inland Rail – the Narrabri to North Star (N2NS).” 

Finance Minister Mathias Cormann said the opening of the Moree office will help build economic resilience in regional Australia.

“Investing in our national freight network will improve connections between our regional communities and important domestic and international markets, ensuring our producers and manufacturers remain globally competitive,” Cormann said.

Member for Parkes and Minister for Regional Services, Decentralisation and Local Government, Mark Coulton said Moree is one of the highest producing agricultural shires in Australia and the region is positioned to drive future freight productivity through road and rail connections to Inland Rail.

“Our investment through Inland Rail builds the essential connections that this region needs to further grow and strengthen their markets,” Coulton said.

He said he is thrilled Doering has been appointed to the Moree office.

“No one knows regional towns like the people who live there,” Coulton said.

Doering will support the implementation of Australian Government programs, including the Inland Rail Interface Improvement Program and expansion of the CSIRO’s Inland Rail TraNSIT study to model potential Inland Rail cost savings.

“The programs we’re delivering will better connect the region to far-reaching ports through an enhanced national network, creating new supply chains that build prosperity in the region – moving the wheat, barley and produce the region is famous for,” Coulton said.

She will also work with industry and community during Inland Rail’s planning and design for projects such as the Macintyre River crossing.

The Moree Office has joined a broader network of Inland Rail Regional Offices that will assist regional activities of Australian Government staff already established in Wodonga, Dubbo and Toowoomba offices.

Midland’s 51-year-old station will be replaced with a new 12,000sqm facility

A new METRONET train station will be built in Perth’s Eastern suburbs.

The McGowan Government has confirmed the relocation of Midland’s new train station will be between Helena and Cale streets.

The current 51-year-old station will be replaced with a new 12,000sqm railcar manufacturing and assembly facility.

The next stage of the project will focus on station layout and design in preparation for procurement and construction.

Transport Minister Rita Saffioti highlighted that the project will integrate transport modes and infrastructure.

“METRONET is not just about creating new rail lines, it’s also about reinvigorating existing stations and infrastructure to provide the community with well-designed places that support walking, cycling and public transport.”

The facility will feature three platforms, a new bus interchange, car park, bicycle facilities and a new shared path.

The Helena Street level crossing will close due to growth in freight rail operations and frequency of metro trains.

The crossing will be replaced with a new one at Cale Street and will connect through to Centennial Place.

The business case for the project has been submitted to Infrastructure Australia and the project definition plan will be completed in mid-2020.

Saffioti said the new Midland Station will make it easier for commuters, local businesses and residents to connect to public transport

“Relocating Midland Station has been high on the wish list of eastern suburbs locals for many years and it is now another step closer to becoming a reality,” Saffioti said.

The new station will be closer to the centre of Midland, Midland Health Campus, and the Workshops precinct.

Midland MLA Michelle Roberts said a new Midland train station has been needed for a long time.

“State of the art facilities, combined with a more central location will help boost train patronage and visitors to local businesses,” Roberts said.

Construction will start on the new manufacturing facility in Bellevue in the first half of this year.

Planning will continue for a future rail extension to Bellevue, which would be delivered in the next stage of the McGowan Government’s METRONET transformation of Perth’s rail network.